The Wall Street Executive

The Wall Street Executive: What You Need to Succeed

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Woman labelled ‘world’s sexiest criminal’ on social media

A woman with 114 criminal charges against her has been labelled the ‘world’s sexiest criminal’ on social media.

Stéphanie Beaudoin, 21, is being described as ‘the perfect woman’ - even though she was arrested last month in connection with the break-ins of 42 homes.

A photo of her in a bikini is being shared repeatedly on Instagram and Twitter ever since it was published by the Montreal Journal.

It follows a similarly bizarre incident back in June, where American prisoner Jeremy Meeks was labelled a ‘hot felon’ after his mugshot went viral.

Similarly, Beaudoin is now taking the internet by storm, with Twitter users writing comments such as: “Stephanie Beaudoin can steal my heart any day.”

A Facebook page describing her as a ‘News Personality appears to have been set up by fans and already has more than 2,000 likes.

People have made comments such as ‘sexy’, ‘break into my house anytime’ and ‘gorgeous angel’.

The nursing student has been charged over 100 times on counts including theft, owning an illegal cache of nine firearms and receiving stolen property.

Beaudoin, of Canada, is now facing jail over claims she worked with three underage accomplices - aged 13, 15 and 17 - to burgle residences in the Athabaska and Maple areas.

They allegedly broke into the homes using the back door or basement windows.

She is due back in court on 17 November 2014.

Telegraph

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Here’s How To Keep Track Of How Much Money Tech Giants Make Every Second
It’s astonishing how much money goes into the pockets of today’s tech giants.
Take Apple, for example. In just seven minutes, the company makes more than $500,000 in profit and $2 million in revenue. And the rest aren’t very far behind.
To help you better understand the insane numbers behind tech giants’ wealth, two companies — PennyStocks and WorldPay Zinc — have created real-time infographics that track how much the tech world brings in per second.
BusinessInsider

Here’s How To Keep Track Of How Much Money Tech Giants Make Every Second

It’s astonishing how much money goes into the pockets of today’s tech giants.

Take Apple, for example. In just seven minutes, the company makes more than $500,000 in profit and $2 million in revenue. And the rest aren’t very far behind.

To help you better understand the insane numbers behind tech giants’ wealth, two companies — PennyStocks and WorldPay Zinc — have created real-time infographics that track how much the tech world brings in per second.

BusinessInsider

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21 Surprising Athletes Who Have Made An Insane Amount Of Money
Nobody is ever surprised when they hear athletes like Tiger Woods or Peyton Manning are among the highest-paid in their sport.
However, in an era with skyrocketing salaries there are also some athletes who are not superstars who have also made a ton of money in their careers.
Most of these athletes are not household names, and yet their career earnings rank them close to their superstar teammates and rivals. Others are superstars or were at one point and yet the surprise is just the sheer amount of money they have been paid in their career.
Here are 21 of the biggest surprises.
Source: BusinessInsider

21 Surprising Athletes Who Have Made An Insane Amount Of Money

Nobody is ever surprised when they hear athletes like Tiger Woods or Peyton Manning are among the highest-paid in their sport.

However, in an era with skyrocketing salaries there are also some athletes who are not superstars who have also made a ton of money in their careers.

Most of these athletes are not household names, and yet their career earnings rank them close to their superstar teammates and rivals. Others are superstars or were at one point and yet the surprise is just the sheer amount of money they have been paid in their career.

Here are 21 of the biggest surprises.



Source: BusinessInsider

2 notes &

9 questions about tax inversions you were embarrassed to ask
On September 22nd, the Treasury Department announced some new measures to crack down on corporate tax inversions. Inversions have languished for years as an arcane sub-element of the already arcane world of corporate income taxation, but over the past couple of months, they’ve surged toward the top of the public agenda in the United States. Burger King is buying Canadian coffee and doughnuts chain Tim Horton’s, in large part in order to perform an inversion so it can start paying corporate income tax at the lower Canadian rate. President Obama dedicated his July 26 radio address to the need to stop them, Treasury SecretaryJack Lew did an op-ed, and Democrats across the board are stepping up their rhetoric against “corporate deserters" and calling for "economic patriotism."
But what the heck is everyone talking about? And why is this suddenly on the agenda? We have answers.
1) What is a tax inversion?
To an extent, a tax inversion is in the eye of the beholder. But the basic idea of a tax inversion is this..Different countries tax corporate profits in different ways and at different rates. So a company whose business is subject to relatively heavy taxation in one country (say, the United States) can buy a smaller company located in a country where its business is taxed at a lower rate (say, Ireland) and then declare the merged entity to be domiciled in the low-tax country for the purposes of taxation. Walgreens, for example, is in the process of buying a Swiss company called Alliance Boots and is considered relabeling itself as a subsidiary of the Swiss company to pay lower Swiss tax rates until forced to abandon the idea after political backlash.
You can think of there as being two levels of tax inversion.
In a modest tax inversion, Company A decides to acquire Company B for some standard set of business reasons. It then turns out to be the case that domiciling the merged entity in Company B’s homeland is more advantageous for tax purposes. Companies, like people, normally seek to exploit legal means of reducing their tax burden. So the merged company will probably domicile itself for tax purposes in Company B’s country.
In a pure tax inversion, Company A decides to acquire Company B specifically in order to execute a tax inversion. In other words, Company A would be acquiring Company B not so much to obtain its technology or its brand or its supply chain but its tax status.
Source: Vox

9 questions about tax inversions you were embarrassed to ask

On September 22nd, the Treasury Department announced some new measures to crack down on corporate tax inversions. Inversions have languished for years as an arcane sub-element of the already arcane world of corporate income taxation, but over the past couple of months, they’ve surged toward the top of the public agenda in the United States. Burger King is buying Canadian coffee and doughnuts chain Tim Horton’s, in large part in order to perform an inversion so it can start paying corporate income tax at the lower Canadian rate. President Obama dedicated his July 26 radio address to the need to stop them, Treasury SecretaryJack Lew did an op-ed, and Democrats across the board are stepping up their rhetoric against “corporate deserters" and calling for "economic patriotism."

But what the heck is everyone talking about? And why is this suddenly on the agenda? We have answers.

1) What is a tax inversion?

To an extent, a tax inversion is in the eye of the beholder. But the basic idea of a tax inversion is this..Different countries tax corporate profits in different ways and at different rates. So a company whose business is subject to relatively heavy taxation in one country (say, the United States) can buy a smaller company located in a country where its business is taxed at a lower rate (say, Ireland) and then declare the merged entity to be domiciled in the low-tax country for the purposes of taxation. Walgreens, for example, is in the process of buying a Swiss company called Alliance Boots and is considered relabeling itself as a subsidiary of the Swiss company to pay lower Swiss tax rates until forced to abandon the idea after political backlash.

You can think of there as being two levels of tax inversion.

In a modest tax inversion, Company A decides to acquire Company B for some standard set of business reasons. It then turns out to be the case that domiciling the merged entity in Company B’s homeland is more advantageous for tax purposes. Companies, like people, normally seek to exploit legal means of reducing their tax burden. So the merged company will probably domicile itself for tax purposes in Company B’s country.

In a pure tax inversion, Company A decides to acquire Company B specifically in order to execute a tax inversion. In other words, Company A would be acquiring Company B not so much to obtain its technology or its brand or its supply chain but its tax status.

Source: Vox

4 notes &

'F**k It, I Quit' Anchor Explains Her Dramatic Exit

The local news anchor who dramatically quit her job on air following a segment on marijuana explained her exit in a YouTube video released Monday.

Charlo Greene, a reporter for Anchorage’s KTVA, announced on air that she would be leaving her job at the TV station to focus on marijuana legalization in Alaska.

“Everything you’ve heard is why I, the actual owner of the Alaska Cannabis Club, will be dedicating all of my energy toward fighting for freedom and fairness, which begins with legalizing marijuana here in Alaska,” she said. “And as for this job, well, not that I have a choice but, f—k it, I quit.”

In the YouTube clip, Greene explained why she believes the fight for marijuana legalization in her home state is so important.

"There comes a time in each and every one of our lives where we must choose to continue to spectate or stand up for what’s right," she said. "Why are Americans arrested every 37 seconds, Alaskans every 4.3 hours? Why should an aspiring someone lose their ability to earn a higher education, to become someone they were not meant to be? And why should you lose the ability to get public assistance in times of struggle and need?"

Source: HuffingtonPost

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The NFL Is Utterly Absurd: 3 Reminders From Sunday
The NFL is absurd; God bless the NFL.
Amid weeks of intense, often disturbing controversy surrounding the NFL, let us not forget one thing: America’s most popular sports league is a totally absurd spectacle, both on the field and off. Viewed through the prism of normal life, then coupled with the league’s current domestic violence crisis, the league’s fundamental absurdity was never in starker relief than it was this weekend.
Let’s take a quick trip through the looking glass with three ludicrous moments from Sunday’s menu of NFL action.
1. Ray Lewis explaining ‘things you can cover up’
Former Baltimore Ravens star Ray Lewis appeared on ESPN’s Sunday NFL Countdown to discuss, among other things, the Ravens’ reported attempt to cover up and whitewash their brewing scandal surrounding running back Ray Rice assaulting his then-fiancée (now wife) in a hotel elevator last February.
Lewis, at one point, told viewers that “there’s some things you can cover up and then there’s some things you can’t.” This was met with incredulity by nearly every longtime NFL observer.
Why were Lewis’ comments met with incredulity by nearly every longtime NFL observer, you ask? Well, back in 2000, Lewis led the Ravens to Super Bowl XXXV. The year before that he was charged with murder after he and a group of friends got in a fight with another group. Two men from the other group were stabbed to death, and blood from one of them was found inside Lewis’ limousine.
Lewis eventually accepted a plea deal for reduced charges in return for testifying against the men he was with.
The white suit Lewis was wearing the night of the killings was never found, and he pleaded guilty to misdemeanor obstruction of justice. He went on to win the following year’s Super Bowl and enjoy a Hall of Fame career, from which he retired in 2013.
So it’s not surprising if his “there’s some things you can cover up and then there’s some things you can’t” arrived with just the slightest bit of irony.
Source: Mashable

The NFL Is Utterly Absurd: 3 Reminders From Sunday

The NFL is absurd; God bless the NFL.

Amid weeks of intense, often disturbing controversy surrounding the NFL, let us not forget one thing: America’s most popular sports league is a totally absurd spectacle, both on the field and off. Viewed through the prism of normal life, then coupled with the league’s current domestic violence crisis, the league’s fundamental absurdity was never in starker relief than it was this weekend.

Let’s take a quick trip through the looking glass with three ludicrous moments from Sunday’s menu of NFL action.

1. Ray Lewis explaining ‘things you can cover up’

Former Baltimore Ravens star Ray Lewis appeared on ESPN’s Sunday NFL Countdown to discuss, among other things, the Ravens’ reported attempt to cover up and whitewash their brewing scandal surrounding running back Ray Rice assaulting his then-fiancée (now wife) in a hotel elevator last February.

Lewis, at one point, told viewers that “there’s some things you can cover up and then there’s some things you can’t.” This was met with incredulity by nearly every longtime NFL observer.

Why were Lewis’ comments met with incredulity by nearly every longtime NFL observer, you ask? Well, back in 2000, Lewis led the Ravens to Super Bowl XXXV. The year before that he was charged with murder after he and a group of friends got in a fight with another group. Two men from the other group were stabbed to death, and blood from one of them was found inside Lewis’ limousine.

Lewis eventually accepted a plea deal for reduced charges in return for testifying against the men he was with.

The white suit Lewis was wearing the night of the killings was never found, and he pleaded guilty to misdemeanor obstruction of justice. He went on to win the following year’s Super Bowl and enjoy a Hall of Fame career, from which he retired in 2013.

So it’s not surprising if his “there’s some things you can cover up and then there’s some things you can’t” arrived with just the slightest bit of irony.

Source: Mashable

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WHEN AND HOW TO WORK WITH RECRUITERS & SEARCH FIRMS

When and how to work with recruiters is a big question for many job seekers. When does it make sense to use a search firm or a recruitment consultant to assist with your job search?
If you seem to be stuck in a rut and you’re not getting enough interviews, it can make sense to use a recruiter to broaden your job search. Just make sure your resume is strong, as a poor resume could be the main reason for the lack of interview calls!
Using a recruiter can also make sense if you’re in a high-level position, since executive jobs are not always advertised or in an industry that typically uses search firms to fill vacancies.
Search firms have contacts in industries and at companies you might not even be aware of. They can help market your resume and provide you with additional exposure to potential employers.
However, having worked in recruitment for close to 10 years, I’ve noticed that a lot of people have unrealistic expectations for the recruiter/job seeker relationship.
This will often lead to resentment because “my headhunter hasn’t found me a job!”
CareerRocketer

WHEN AND HOW TO WORK WITH RECRUITERS & SEARCH FIRMS

When and how to work with recruiters is a big question for many job seekers. When does it make sense to use a search firm or a recruitment consultant to assist with your job search?

If you seem to be stuck in a rut and you’re not getting enough interviews, it can make sense to use a recruiter to broaden your job search. Just make sure your resume is strong, as a poor resume could be the main reason for the lack of interview calls!

Using a recruiter can also make sense if you’re in a high-level position, since executive jobs are not always advertised or in an industry that typically uses search firms to fill vacancies.

Search firms have contacts in industries and at companies you might not even be aware of. They can help market your resume and provide you with additional exposure to potential employers.

However, having worked in recruitment for close to 10 years, I’ve noticed that a lot of people have unrealistic expectations for the recruiter/job seeker relationship.

This will often lead to resentment because “my headhunter hasn’t found me a job!”

CareerRocketer

4 notes &

What People Say On Their CV, Vs. What They Mean

1. “Dynamic” - No-one knows what this means. Writing it down anyway.2. “Accustomed to thinking outside the box” - Sometimes I use pink AND yellow highlighter pens.3. “Committed to fostering a creative environment” - I bloody love flipcharts.4. “Serial entrepreneur” - My businesses keep failing.5. “Visionary” - I think I’m wonderful.6. “Intensely results focused” - Shark-eyed psychopath who is gunning for your job.7. “Unflappable” - My response to most things: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.8. “Team player” - This should set me apart from all the anti-social loners who apply for the job.9. “I’m detail-oriented” - As opposed to those people who despise detail of all kinds.10. “I work well in a group” - Bet you’ve never heard that one before.11. “High emotional intelligence” - I will spend most lunchtimes crying in the toilets.12. “Inspirational leadership style” - Everyone hates me.13. “I’m passionate about…” - I will now bullshit outrageously on the subject of…”14. “Looking for a new challenge” - About to be fired.15. “Highly motivated” - Desperate.16. “I’m enthusiastic” - I will suggest all manner of annoying team-bonding exercises.17. “Hobbies include…” - I haven’t quite filled a side of A4 yet, so…18. “Reading, watching films, and socialising” - Don’t act like you’re not intrigued.19. “Energetic” - As opposed to being sluggish and indolent.20. “Committed” - Will turn up to work most days, hangovers permitting.21. “Proactive” - I do stuff. 22. “I have a wide range of skills” - I’m not very good at anything.23. “Punctual” - I get in ten minutes early to steal all the nice biscuits.24. “I bring out the best in people” - I’m so lazy everybody else has to work twice as hard.25. “Proficient in a wide range of information technologies, including Microsoft Word” - I cannot think of anything to write here.26. “Creative powerhouse” - Nobody is as good at nicking other people’s ideas as me.27. “Have become an invaluable member of the team” - Nobody else knows how to unblock paper jams in the photocopier.28. “Driven” - I maintain inbox zero with an obsessive zeal that will make you fear for my sanity.29. “Intense” - Dreadful wanker.30. “I’m a people person” - I’m that guy who asks everyone to gather round and awkwardly sing happy birthday to you at your desk.31. “I’m a perfect fit for the team” - I haven’t actually met the team yet but…32. “I’m a problem solver” - I will find supposed problems where none exist.33. “Strong interpersonal skills” - Capable of handling most workplace situations without headbutting anyone or calling them a tosser.34. “I’m a born organiser” - I love scheduling pointless meetings.35. “I’m creative” - I love scheduling pointless brainstorms.36. “I’m professional” - I love creating pointless spreadsheets.37. “I’m easygoing and laid back” - You don’t expect me to do actual work, do you?38. “I’m fun and outgoing” - I think this is a dating profile.39. “References available upon request” - Praying you don’t request references.40. “I’m always looking for new challenges” - I’ve failed all my previous challenges.41. “Social media skills” - I tweet a lot.42. “Social media expert” - I manually RT wisdom by other people in a shameless bid to garner retweets.43. “Formidable social media presence” - I bought a shit ton of followers.44. “Video editing skills” - Once spent an afternoon dicking around with iMovie.45. “I’m keen to focus on the next stage of my career” - I’ve shagged everybody in this office and now I need an escape plan.46. “Achievements include…” - I will now take credit for things that happened at my company that actually had nothing to do with me.47. “Experience working in a fast-paced environment” - Rarely fall asleep at my desk these days.48. “Fluent in…” - “Dimly remember a smattering of…”49. “Communications director” - I get paid an insane amount of money for taking people out to lunch.50. “PR executive” - I send a lot of emails that journalists ignore.51. “PR director” - I phone up journalists and ask them why they ignored the emails.52. “Strategist” - Bullshitter.53. “Analyst” - Pie chart specialist.54. “Chief Evangelist” - LOL not even I know what I get paid for.55. “Management consultant” - I go into companies and write long reports telling them to sack the people they had already decided to sack anyway.56. “Client-facing creative synergies” - These words sound pretty good together, right?57. “Delivering multi-platform, full-stack content solutions” - Please don’t ask me to explain what this entails.58. “Rock star” - Huge douche.59. “Contact me at davidhthomas@hotmail.com” - I still think it’s the ’90s.60. “My application takes the form of a viral video…” - Delete, delete, delete.61. “I like to work hard and play hard” - I am worse than Hitler.
BuzzFeed

What People Say On Their CV, Vs. What They Mean

1. “Dynamic” - No-one knows what this means. Writing it down anyway.
2. “Accustomed to thinking outside the box” - Sometimes I use pink AND yellow highlighter pens.
3. “Committed to fostering a creative environment” - I bloody love flipcharts.
4. “Serial entrepreneur” - My businesses keep failing.
5. “Visionary” - I think I’m wonderful.
6. “Intensely results focused” - Shark-eyed psychopath who is gunning for your job.
7. “Unflappable” - My response to most things: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.
8. “Team player” - This should set me apart from all the anti-social loners who apply for the job.
9. “I’m detail-oriented” - As opposed to those people who despise detail of all kinds.
10. “I work well in a group” - Bet you’ve never heard that one before.
11. “High emotional intelligence” - I will spend most lunchtimes crying in the toilets.
12. “Inspirational leadership style” - Everyone hates me.
13. “I’m passionate about…” - I will now bullshit outrageously on the subject of…”
14. “Looking for a new challenge” - About to be fired.
15. “Highly motivated” - Desperate.
16. “I’m enthusiastic” - I will suggest all manner of annoying team-bonding exercises.
17. “Hobbies include…” - I haven’t quite filled a side of A4 yet, so…
18. “Reading, watching films, and socialising” - Don’t act like you’re not intrigued.
19. “Energetic” - As opposed to being sluggish and indolent.
20. “Committed” - Will turn up to work most days, hangovers permitting.
21. “Proactive” - I do stuff. 
22. “I have a wide range of skills” - I’m not very good at anything.
23. “Punctual” - I get in ten minutes early to steal all the nice biscuits.
24. “I bring out the best in people” - I’m so lazy everybody else has to work twice as hard.
25. “Proficient in a wide range of information technologies, including Microsoft Word” - I cannot think of anything to write here.
26. “Creative powerhouse” - Nobody is as good at nicking other people’s ideas as me.
27. “Have become an invaluable member of the team” - Nobody else knows how to unblock paper jams in the photocopier.
28. “Driven” - I maintain inbox zero with an obsessive zeal that will make you fear for my sanity.
29. “Intense” - Dreadful wanker.
30. “I’m a people person” - I’m that guy who asks everyone to gather round and awkwardly sing happy birthday to you at your desk.
31. “I’m a perfect fit for the team” - I haven’t actually met the team yet but…
32. “I’m a problem solver” - I will find supposed problems where none exist.
33. “Strong interpersonal skills” - Capable of handling most workplace situations without headbutting anyone or calling them a tosser.
34. “I’m a born organiser” - I love scheduling pointless meetings.
35. “I’m creative” - I love scheduling pointless brainstorms.
36. “I’m professional” - I love creating pointless spreadsheets.
37. “I’m easygoing and laid back” - You don’t expect me to do actual work, do you?
38. “I’m fun and outgoing” - I think this is a dating profile.
39. “References available upon request” - Praying you don’t request references.
40. “I’m always looking for new challenges” - I’ve failed all my previous challenges.
41. “Social media skills” - I tweet a lot.
42. “Social media expert” - I manually RT wisdom by other people in a shameless bid to garner retweets.
43. “Formidable social media presence” - I bought a shit ton of followers.
44. “Video editing skills” - Once spent an afternoon dicking around with iMovie.
45. “I’m keen to focus on the next stage of my career” - I’ve shagged everybody in this office and now I need an escape plan.
46. “Achievements include…” - I will now take credit for things that happened at my company that actually had nothing to do with me.
47. “Experience working in a fast-paced environment” - Rarely fall asleep at my desk these days.
48. “Fluent in…” - “Dimly remember a smattering of…”
49. “Communications director” - I get paid an insane amount of money for taking people out to lunch.
50. “PR executive” - I send a lot of emails that journalists ignore.
51. “PR director” - I phone up journalists and ask them why they ignored the emails.
52. “Strategist” - Bullshitter.
53. “Analyst” - Pie chart specialist.
54. “Chief Evangelist” - LOL not even I know what I get paid for.
55. “Management consultant” - I go into companies and write long reports telling them to sack the people they had already decided to sack anyway.
56. “Client-facing creative synergies” - These words sound pretty good together, right?
57. “Delivering multi-platform, full-stack content solutions” - Please don’t ask me to explain what this entails.
58. “Rock star” - Huge douche.
59. “Contact me at davidhthomas@hotmail.com” - I still think it’s the ’90s.
60. “My application takes the form of a viral video…” - Delete, delete, delete.
61. “I like to work hard and play hard” - I am worse than Hitler.

BuzzFeed

1 note &

The Securities and Exchange Commission Finds Deficiencies at Hedge Funds

Recent examinations of hedge funds have uncovered a range of problems, a top Securities and Exchange Commission official said, including firms boosting their performance, and the fees they collect, by changing the way they value investments.

Andrew Bowden, the director of the SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations, said the agency has found a series of deficiencies at the roughly 185 hedge-fund firms in which it completed exams.

The findings come as the SEC begins more closely scrutinizing hedge funds, which have historically operated with less oversight than other investment managers.

The agency, in the wake of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial-overhaul law, has begun requiring a wider swath of hedge funds and private-equity funds to register with the agency and provide detailed data on trading.

Filed under hedge fund Securities and Exchange Commission compliance compliancex

83 notes &

yahoonewsphotos:

Flood Wall Street demonstration

Hundreds of protesters marched through New York City’s financial district on Monday to call attention to what organizers say is capitalism’s contribution to climate change, snarling traffic and risking arrest as they sought to block Wall Street.

The Flood Wall Street demonstration comes on the heels of Sunday’s international day of action that brought some 310,000 people to the streets of New York City in the largest single protest ever held over climate change.

Marchers gathered at a waterfront park before marching into the financial district, surprising New Yorkers and police by turning off Broadway and against traffic into smaller streets, against the flow of traffic. (Reuters)

Find more news related pictures on our photo galleries page and follow us on Tumblr.


2 notes &

49ers and Cardinals fans involved in bloody stadium brawl

This brawl in the stands between 49ers and Cardinals fans is extremely ugly. To make matters worse, members of stadium security got dragged into it. They didn’t choose to get drunk and hurl insults, they were just there to work. Alcohol combined with heated emotions and tribalism is never a good mix. Seriously how about behaving like NFL fans and less like NFL players?

Here’s a quick rule of thumb to being a good fan:

Are you behaving like a human being who is a well-adjusted member of society?

- If YES: Congratulations, you’re ready to watch the game.

- If NO: Don’t go to football games.

SBNation

2 notes &

Company You’ve Never Heard Of Is Now Bigger Than Facebook
The Chinese company Alibaba started trading on the New York Stock Exchange Friday after the biggest initial public offering in human history. It immediately won ALL OF THE MONEYS.
At its opening price of $92.70 a share — representing an immediate 36 percent windfall for insiders who got the stock at its $68 IPO price — the e-commerce giant was worth about $228 billion, or more than Facebook, finance blogger/conspiracy theorist Zerohedge tweeted:

The latest ranking http://t.co/MTdLBt7n3C pic.twitter.com/92Absjvko8
— zerohedge (@zerohedge) September 19, 2014



The stock briefly shot to $99 a share, which made it BIGGER THAN FREAKING WALMART:

How high BABA got pic.twitter.com/PCMBLFeVGM
— zerohedge (@zerohedge) September 19, 2014




The stock ended trading at $93.89 a share, a 38 percent gain, giving it a valuation of $231.4 billion, leaving it just below Chevron and just above Procter & Gamble in terms of market value. Facebook was worth a mere $202 billion.
Source: HuffingtonPost

Company You’ve Never Heard Of Is Now Bigger Than Facebook

The Chinese company Alibaba started trading on the New York Stock Exchange Friday after the biggest initial public offering in human history. It immediately won ALL OF THE MONEYS.

At its opening price of $92.70 a share — representing an immediate 36 percent windfall for insiders who got the stock at its $68 IPO price — the e-commerce giant was worth about $228 billion, or more than Facebook, finance blogger/conspiracy theorist Zerohedge tweeted:

The stock briefly shot to $99 a share, which made it BIGGER THAN FREAKING WALMART:

The stock ended trading at $93.89 a share, a 38 percent gain, giving it a valuation of $231.4 billion, leaving it just below Chevron and just above Procter & Gamble in terms of market value. Facebook was worth a mere $202 billion.

Source: HuffingtonPost