The Wall Street Executive

The Wall Street Executive: What You Need to Succeed

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It is now time to take a step back, breath deep, and ask yourself these  18 questions to  determine if the new job is right for you.

You are close to the final stages of interviewing. During the interviewing process you are caught up in the game; selling yourself to the company, hoping everyone likes you, balancing work at your current job, and dashing off for interviews.
 It is now time to take a step back, breath deep and ask yourself these  18 questions to  determine if the job is right for you.

1.       Am I just doing it for the money? At times it is fine to be a mercenary, however, just be honest with yourself about it. Often  a firm will pay a premium to a candidate because the company recognizes that the hiring manager may be too difficult to work with, the company is in trouble, the job itself offers little or no growth and you may be stuck in the same role for years.

2.       Does the job offer growth opportunities? It is great to obtain a new job with more money but is it a trap? Will you be stuck doing the same job 1,2,3,4 years from now?

3.       Will you work well the manager? The money could be terrific and the firm is wonderful but if you will not be able to work well the hiring manager it is a problem. You may become unhappy, less productive and end up leaving the company for a lesser next job just to get away from your boss.

4.       Do you feel that there is camaraderie amongst the people you will work with? Having a strong support system is extremely helpful for enjoying the day and excelling in the job. It also make those difficult days more bearable.

5.       How does management view the role? Are they supportive or could they care less? It may not be worthwhile to accept a job that is unimportant to the big picture at the company. You will not have the recourses, management buy-in, and respect from others to succeed.

6.       Does the company demonstrate values and ethics you can live with?

7.       Do you feel that you will be happy there (as happy as you can be at work)?

8.       How do others view the company within your area of specialization? Is it looked upon favorably so that when/if you decide to move jobs the company brand will help you in the next search.

9.       Will the job offer you the chance to work from your strengths so that you could thrive. Nothing can be more frustrating and stressful than working in a role that you don’t possess the required skills for, even if the money is great.

10.   Does management support internal growth, promotions, lateral moves, and assistance with continuing educations? You want to ensure that there is mobility otherwise your career will stagnate.

11.   Is there a work/life balance?

12.   Are you coming in at the right level relative to your experience?

13.   Is the compensation attractive, or at least fair, considering your level of experience?

14.   Will you have the necessary power, influence, authority, management support, and resources to succeed in the job?

15.   Is your family supportive of the job?

16.   Is the commute reasonable?

17.   Are you willing to accept the level of stress associated with the job?

18.   Are you running away from your old job instead of falling in love with the new job?

 

This list is just a starting point. Before you move, it is imperative to take the time to honestly assess if the job meets the above and other personal requirements. It is incredibly frustrating to change  jobs only to later realize that it is not right for you and feeling trapped.

It is now time to take a step back, breath deep, and ask yourself these  18 questions to  determine if the new job is right for you.

You are close to the final stages of interviewing. During the interviewing process you are caught up in the game; selling yourself to the company, hoping everyone likes you, balancing work at your current job, and dashing off for interviews.

 It is now time to take a step back, breath deep and ask yourself these  18 questions to  determine if the job is right for you.

1.       Am I just doing it for the money? At times it is fine to be a mercenary, however, just be honest with yourself about it. Often  a firm will pay a premium to a candidate because the company recognizes that the hiring manager may be too difficult to work with, the company is in trouble, the job itself offers little or no growth and you may be stuck in the same role for years.

2.       Does the job offer growth opportunities? It is great to obtain a new job with more money but is it a trap? Will you be stuck doing the same job 1,2,3,4 years from now?

3.       Will you work well the manager? The money could be terrific and the firm is wonderful but if you will not be able to work well the hiring manager it is a problem. You may become unhappy, less productive and end up leaving the company for a lesser next job just to get away from your boss.

4.       Do you feel that there is camaraderie amongst the people you will work with? Having a strong support system is extremely helpful for enjoying the day and excelling in the job. It also make those difficult days more bearable.

5.       How does management view the role? Are they supportive or could they care less? It may not be worthwhile to accept a job that is unimportant to the big picture at the company. You will not have the recourses, management buy-in, and respect from others to succeed.

6.       Does the company demonstrate values and ethics you can live with?

7.       Do you feel that you will be happy there (as happy as you can be at work)?

8.       How do others view the company within your area of specialization? Is it looked upon favorably so that when/if you decide to move jobs the company brand will help you in the next search.

9.       Will the job offer you the chance to work from your strengths so that you could thrive. Nothing can be more frustrating and stressful than working in a role that you don’t possess the required skills for, even if the money is great.

10.   Does management support internal growth, promotions, lateral moves, and assistance with continuing educations? You want to ensure that there is mobility otherwise your career will stagnate.

11.   Is there a work/life balance?

12.   Are you coming in at the right level relative to your experience?

13.   Is the compensation attractive, or at least fair, considering your level of experience?

14.   Will you have the necessary power, influence, authority, management support, and resources to succeed in the job?

15.   Is your family supportive of the job?

16.   Is the commute reasonable?

17.   Are you willing to accept the level of stress associated with the job?

18.   Are you running away from your old job instead of falling in love with the new job?

 

This list is just a starting point. Before you move, it is imperative to take the time to honestly assess if the job meets the above and other personal requirements. It is incredibly frustrating to change  jobs only to later realize that it is not right for you and feeling trapped.

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